Tea Olives & Seasons of Love

The seasons of life are often unpredictable. The Broadway hit “Rent” has a song that always lights me up, “Seasons of Love.” 525,600 minutes are the time span of every year, but it can never adequately describe what happens in that year. What makes for a good year or a bad one depends on the content of each moment. We should make them count, but we live our lives in counter-productive ways that waste both time and money. We live as if our mantra is: Spend it; Save it; and Share it, when our values would better reflect God’s if we reversed the order: Share it; Save it; and Spend it. In the words of “Seasons of Love,” “that’s how to measure a year in a life!”

How do we measure a person’s contributions? Is it our obituary, the influence we’ve had on others, the fruit of our labors, a tree planted years ago? I’ve often told persons who serve on the Staff-Parish Relations Committee of their local church that service on SPRC is one thing for sure that ought to be in their obituary. It’s such a tough, but important committee. Most of us have read the poem “The Dash” by Linda Ellis (http://www.linda-ellis.com/the-dash-the-dash-poem-by-linda-ellis-.html). It is a reminder that the most important thing on anyone’s tombstone isn’t the birth and death date, but the dash in-between and what it represents.

So I’m planning to go shopping in a little while for a fragrant tea olive. We have a spot beside our house that is begging for something to go there. I love tea olives. Their fragrance immediately takes me back to walking past The Russell House at USC in the fall. How wonderful it would be that our presence with others would transport them to a pleasant memory. I want my grandchildren to smell this tree and say, “That’s MacMac’s tree!” We’re all God’s trees planted for a divine purpose. How’s our fruit and fragrance?

Sometimes my years are more measured by my distance rather than my closeness to God. It is really a daily, weekly thing. A diet and good eating habits are only good if they are habits. The same with spiritual disciplines. We all have spells when we get off the wagon of healthy living, and it’s so hard to get back on. If today is the first day of the rest of my life then some changes need to be made. Planting that fragrant tea olive is a baby step. Going to the Y in the morning will be a bigger one. I have 35 days until my annual physical. If I want to have more seasons to love, I’ve got to do my part to make sure that it happens.

Good stewardship isn’t just about our material wealth. It includes our health, too, spiritually and physically, but the silken snare of disinterest and apathy are hindrances to good habits. I loved playing hide-and-seek as a child. Living in a large creaky semi-spooky house with lots of places to hide was a boon. Younger cousins would be toughest to play with because they couldn’t count as well, or they cheated. They would count off to one hundred and say those familiar words, “Ready or not, here I come!” Unfortunately, their counting to 100 often went 1,2,3,4,5, on up to 20 or so, then skip to 94,95,96,97,98,99, 100 and then the warning of “Here I come.”

Because it was my home, I, of course, knew all the best places to hide. Here’s what I discovered. After they went by me for the umpteenth time and I had held back my snickering, I finally got bored. Yes, I would get bored even though the object of the game was not to be caught. I would invariably knock on a wall, or try to throw my voice in order to get caught. I can hear them now, “I found you! I found you! You’re it!” I wouldn’t let on that I let them find me. That would be admitting my own disregard for the rules and purpose of the game. To admit being bored is embarrassing.

Truth be told, however, that’s the way I am with life sometimes. I don’t want to admit that I’m bored when I squirrel away my money for some new splurge, get tired of my unapproved past times, or start disagreeing with my stated opinions on touchy subjects. I end up hiding from God and others, and I know what I need to do.

 I need to admit that boredom and fess up. There comes a time to get caught because the alternative is being stuck in some crack of a hiding place in a creaky old house. That creaky old house might be our own body, soul, or mind. We’re better off coming out from our hiding places and planting a tree, going to the gym, visiting a relative, writing a thank-you note, or a sundry other things that make our dash a joy about which people will smell a tea olive and say, “That reminds me of Tim!” and it’s a joy for them to remember us and not a curse. I’m headed to the nursery to buy a tree! What are you going to do? Come out, come out, wherever you are!

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7 thoughts on “Tea Olives & Seasons of Love

  1. Dr. Tim…I enjoy reading your Potter’s View. Allan and I planted a Tea Olive tree in the yard of our first home in Augusta. We loved that fragrant smell each time we walked out our back door. We left it behind we when moved to RH, but years later when we built our third home, we were blessed to find “wild” tea olive in our back yard next to the creek, and we knew we had built on the right lot..still here today ! So, when Allana and JP built their first home this year, we planted a tea olive in their yard. So, the smell of the tea olive continues in our family. Thanks for sharing your stories !

  2. You could go buy a tea olive, or I could root one for you off of the half-dozen or so in our back yard.Would take a few weeks. You know, skin the bark, wrap it in peat moss, wrap aluminum foil around that, then wait. Your call. kp

    On Wed, Sep 21, 2016 at 1:40 PM, A Potter’s View wrote:

    > wtmcclendon posted: ” The seasons of life are often unpredictable. The > Broadway hit “Rent” has a song that always lights me up, “Seasons of Love.” > 525,600 minutes are the time span of every year, but it can never > adequately describe what happens in that year. What makes for a” >

    1. Thanks, Ken! Probably the way I should go but have hopes to jumpstart things before Cindy is home from babysitting! Might call you, tim

      Sent from my iPhone

      On Sep 21, 2016, at 4:50 PM, A Potter's View wrote:

      WordPress.com Respond to this comment by replying above this line New comment on A Potter’s View

      *Ken & Nancy Perrine commented on Tea Olives & Seasons of Love *

      The seasons of life are often unpredictable. The Broadway hit “Rent” …

      You could go buy a tea olive, or I could root one for you off of the half-dozen or so in our back yard.Would take a few weeks. You know, skin the bark, wrap it in peat moss, wrap aluminum foil around that, then wait. Your call. kp

  3. At my mothers funeral (Carolyn Johnson) you referenced that poem. You dontt know how many people were touched by it and talk about it to this day. Love it.

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