What If God Was One of Us?

N. Wilder’s “Grace Confounding” states about Jesus, “He came when he wasn’t expected as he always does, though a few on the night-shift had the release early. He came where he wasn’t expected as he always does, though a few Magis were tipped off…he is always one step ahead of us.”

 In a similar vein, one of my all-time favorite television shows was “Joan of Arcadia” which even in its title reminds one of Joan of Arc and her visions of God. If you can buy the boxed series set or catch reruns, please do it! The show takes place in a ficitional town named “Arcadia” where Joan Girardi lives. The show was the creation of Barbara Hall, a spiritual seeker herself, who dares us to consider that God may be one of us. In the show God appeared in a variety of cryptic personages: as a bum, a goth teenager, a little girl, etc. Please don’t get hung up on the imagery, especially as Joan Osborne’s song, “What if God Was One of Us?” plays at each show’s opening. It seems sacrilegious at first glance to see God, the Divine, as “a stranger on a bus, a slob like one of us (one of Osborne’s lines),” but Jesus’ incarnation in Bethlehem dares us to broaden our horizons and ask how this world would be different if we did treat the people we would normally ignore as if they were God. I’m not suggesting some heresy that we treat people as if they were gods in an idolatrous way, but as if they were carrying the precious imago dei, the Image of God, within them. That doesn’t seem to be too much to ask, especially if the end result is worth the risk.

 Perhaps you have heard the story of the monastery that was dying for lack of new monks. There was a negative spirit that permeated the whole place, evidenced by much jealousy and blatant apathy toward one another in the community. In desperation, the monastery’s leader went to the hut of a wise hermit deep in the forest. The abbot described the lack of love among the monks and asked for advice about what could be done to foster better relations. The hermit simply responded by saying, “The Messiah is among you.” He said nothing more. Upon his return to the monastery the abbot told the monks what the hermit had said. As a result, people who were once either envious or apathetic about one another started asking themselves, “Could the Messiah be Brother Andrew the baker, who humbly does his task?” or “Could the Messiah be Brother Simon the chief gardener, who with great kindness provides us with food to eat?” Their wonderings included everybody and the effect was miraculous. Because of the wise hermit’s statement the monks began treating each other with such love and respect that it indeed seemed that the Messiah was among them. The monastery began to grow and thrive because of their newfound love for one another.

 The Messiah is among us, too. Of course, I know that Jesus is the Messiah, the one-and-only. However, we’ll never begin to experience the power of the gospel until we SEE Jesus in everybody, both friend and foe around us. Open your eyes to God’s fresh incarnation in Jesus Christ!

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One thought on “What If God Was One of Us?

  1. Jesus gave us the privilege to forgive sins unilaterally also. “If you forgive anyone’s sins, they are forgiven. If you do not forgive them, they are not forgiven.”

    I used the word “privilege,” but the word “authority” is probably more accurate. But instead of viewing this authority to forgive sins in some judicial sense, I think it’s more important to see it in a personal sense.

    What is is about us that we don’t want to forgive sin? Why would any Christian choose to hold a person’s sin against them? Why would we bind a person’s sin to them? Sin is such a destructive burden.

    If we bind people to their sin here on earth, there is some sense in which that sin is bound also in heaven.

    Unilateral forgiveness is clearly described in Jeremiah 31:31-34. Forgiveness comes first, then metanoia, that change of allegiance away from the kosmos to the kingdom of God. Paul was deeply influenced by Jeremiah’s prophesied New Covenant, but Christendom pretty much ignores it because they really do want to hold on to their expanded and updated Rule Book.

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